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 ⇒ Level 3 Diploma in Adult Care ⇒ Level 3 Diploma Optional Units ⇒ Unit 319 Understand person-centred thinking and planning ⇒ 3.3 Identify challenges that may be faced in implementing person-centred thinking, planning and reviews in own work

3.3 Identify challenges that may be faced in implementing person-centred thinking, planning and reviews in own work

Qualification: Level 3 Diploma in Adult Care Optional Units
Unit: Unit 319 Understand person-centred thinking and planning
Learning outcome: 3 Understand own role in person-centred planning
Assessment criteria: 3.3 Identify challenges that may be faced in implementing person-centred thinking, planning and reviews in own work

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  • Resistance to Change: Some staff may resist adopting new practices, preferring traditional, task-oriented approaches over person-centred methods.
  • Time Constraints: Finding adequate time for in-depth, person-centred planning and reviews can be challenging in busy work environments.
  • Lack of Training: Staff may lack proper training in person-centred thinking skills, tools, and approaches, hindering effective implementation.
  • Resource Limitations: Limited resources, such as staffing or financial constraints, can impact the ability to fully implement person-centred practices.
  • Cultural Barriers: Organisational culture may not fully support person-centred values, making it difficult to embed these practices in everyday work.
  • Inconsistent Application: Variability in how person-centred thinking is applied across teams or services can lead to inconsistent experiences for individuals.
  • Communication Challenges: Effective communication with individuals, especially those with complex communication needs, can be challenging, impacting the quality of person-centred planning.
  • Documentation Overload: The need for thorough documentation in person-centred planning can be overwhelming and time-consuming for staff.
  • Engaging Families and Carers: Difficulty in engaging families and carers in the planning process can hinder the development of fully person-centred plans.
  • Balancing Risks: Finding a balance between supporting individuals to take risks and ensuring their safety and wellbeing can be complex.
  • Maintaining Focus: Keeping the focus on the individual’s preferences and needs, rather than organisational priorities or limitations, can be challenging in practice.
  • Updating Plans: Ensuring person-centred plans are regularly reviewed and updated to reflect changing needs and circumstances requires ongoing attention and effort.
  • Measuring Outcomes: Developing clear, measurable outcomes that reflect person-centred values and goals can be difficult but is essential for evaluating effectiveness.
  • Addressing these challenges requires a commitment to continuous learning, support from leadership, adequate training, and resources, as well as a collaborative approach involving individuals, their families, and all staff.
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